New Zealand: The Ultimate Travel Guide

New Zealand is beautiful, it’s people are also beautiful, and there simply is no better place to be if you are living there or on holiday.

New Zealand’s landscape is only unique in its variety not in its individual features. You can see beaches and mountains all over the place. But in New Zealand, you can see all of these things and many more within the space of a day (although you’ll probably need a whole month to appreciate them fully). If you’re living here or working here this means you can go where you want and do what you’d like to do at the drop of a hat and generally without the crowds of people you might expect to find at attractions in other countries.

People who travel in New Zealand always find they have somewhere to visit or place to stay because the locals will have shown them the best the area has to offer and probably even given them a spare bed for the night (failing that a sofa).

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For those who are lucky enough to have the privilege of working in New Zealand, you’re probably already familiar with the kiwi custom of inviting the new guy/gal to at least two barbecues in their first week on the job. This number of course only grows with the number of people you meet in your workplace and it might be advisable to find some good excuses to avoid the excessive barbecues else the waistline may expand beyond all reasonable proportions.

It’s not usually a matter of what to do in New Zealand, but how to do it. Many people choose the option of traveling independently – using a rental car, camper van or even bussing or cycling through the country. Others believe a New Zealand escorted tour makes better sense because you’ve always got an expert on hand and all the hard work and planning has been done for you. Both have their pros and cons, but it’s a good idea to think about your decision beforehand to make sure you choose the right holiday for your stay in New Zealand.

Traveling independently doesn’t necessarily mean traveling alone. You may be with one or more people, traveling as the whim takes you, staying a while when it suits and moving on when you’ve had enough. Independent travelers may also have fairly set timetables. Some travelers do plenty of research and prepare a route – from somewhere like Auckland in the North Island to Christchurch in the South Island – using ideas from travel brochures.

You can spend as long as you like tasting wine in Marlborough and spend a few extra days in Wellington to visit Te Papa and travel on the cable car up to the Botanical Gardens. If things go smoothly, you’ll be happy. However, that may not happen. Traveling times can be deceiving, your information could be wrong and any number of things can occur to upset your carefully planned timetable.